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New Tow-Rating Standard to Be Adopted By Truck Manufacturers

New Tow-Rating Standard to Be Adopted By Truck Manufacturers

  • Trucks make a lot of money for manufacturers and dealerships. How can you not elevate your own awesomeness and manliness when you’re driving the powerhouse of a truck that can tow a cruise ship up the side of a rugged mountain in a blizzard?

     

    Here’s the problem. All of the clever advertising in the world won’t change the fact that tow ratings claimed by auto manufacturers in ads are exactly that – empty claims. We don’t know each manufacturer’s testing procedures. All we know is that the increasingly astronomical tow ratings for different types of trucks are impossible to compare and seem wildly unrealistic.

     

    It’s kind of a “my dad can beat up your dad” situation. Everyone can make the claim because nobody can prove it.

     

    Fortunately, it seems like the truck makers are finally growing up. Ford, General Motors and Chrysler are reportedly ready to join Toyota in adopting the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) J2807 common tow-rating standards. The SAE J2807 standard will include dozens of tests to evaluate a truck’s structure, propulsion, handling, brakes and other features.

     

    Simply put, the new standard is designed to reflect how trucks are really used.

     

    J2807 makes it possible for truck buyers to directly compare the tow ratings from different auto manufacturers, who will follow the same testing procedures and rate their trucks based on standard guidelines. It also means you’ll have a much better idea of how much weight each vehicle can safely tow instead of hoping manufacturer claims are legitimate.

     

    Toyota began using the J2807 standard in 2011 while other manufacturers seemed to play a game of chicken, waiting for someone else – namely, Ford – to take the first step. Ford, GM and Chrysler have announced that they’ll adopt the standard for their 2015 models, although Chevrolet will only use J2807 if Ford does first.

     

    We’ll pass you a note in study hall if someone decides to back out.